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Cleaning the vanes on a TDI turbo


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#1 mbames

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 09:35

I think the time has come for me to do this task..... yay, I am so looking forward to black sooty hands!

As few people have done this, I wondered if anyone was prepared to write up the process / roughly guide me through it. When I do mine, I am happy to take some pictures and try and document the process to make a proper guide on here if it is felt that it would be beneficial to other members.

My current questions are:
- what gaskets do I need
- between the turbo and manifold, or the manifold and the engine?
- turbo to exhaust pipe
- any gaskets/seals in the turbo for the limited amount that I will be taking out?

I am guessing steps are:
- undo EGR pipework from above
- remove engine undertray
- remove the vacuum pipe from the actuator
- remove air pipework
- undo the oil feeder pipe & block off
- undo the exhaust pipework?
- remove from the manifold?
- extract from under the car

- clean up

- refit with what new gaskets?

If time allows, maybe drop the intercooler out and clean it and fit a new MAP too (although I might reserve that task for when I do my next cambelt in 5k miles time.

Hopefully this will put an end to my posts on this topic..... :smirk:

Thanks,
Matt

#2 lumac999

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 10:01

Just a thought Matt.

I have had 'limp mode' probs with mine very similar to sticky vanes problem although not confirmed with the fault code. I changed the N75 (known to need at least two in the lifetime of the car) and MAP, although I didn't really know which was at fault. Cost around 85 quid from Skoda for both parts.

Have you considered changing these as it would be preferable to removing the turbo and cleaning it?

Or are you positive that the vanes are sticking and not associated with sensors or pipework etc?

Nick

#3 mbames

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 10:30

I have changed the n75 (twice) in the past, and virtually everything else (apart from the MAP). I am sure it is sticky vanes as when I remove the vacuum hose I can hardly move the actuator on the turbo, the old girl is up to 175k, so that is quite a lot of soot to have passed through the turbo.

#4 rwbaldwin

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 11:13

I was sure there was a thread that gave all details, but I couldn't find it.

The manifold and turbo are removed as one piece. You need an exhaust gasket (about £10) and an exhaust pipe gasket (gets a set of nuts - just in case).

The inlet manifold gasket is a torque deformable metal type. Many people don't replace this gasket and most don't have problems. They only cost about £5 - the choice is yours.

You will also need an oil feed return gasket.

You need to raise the car to the minimum height at which you can get under the car and work. Often 4" is enough. Raise it too high and it's difficult to get at things from the top.

If you don't have the right tool, the biggest problem with this job is to get the pipe clips off.

From memory, the sequence is roughly

Remove undertray.
Remove compressor side pipework
Remove exhaust pipe connection to turbo
Remove vacuum tube to turbo
Remove engine cover
Remove air pipe to EGR
Remove air pipe from airbox (gives better access)
Remove vacuum pipe to EGR
Remove butterfly valve connection.
Remove upper bolts on exhaust-EGR pipe.
Remove heatshield between exhaust and inlet manifolds
Remove inlet manifold (make sure you don't round any of the hex head bolts)
Remove lower nuts on exhaust-EGR pipe.
Remove bracket for oil feed pipe.
Remove oil feed connection to turbo - be ready for oil
Remove oil return from turbo - be ready for even more oil
Remove turbo support bracket-engine bolt
Remove exhaust manifold nuts and remove turbo

When refitting, fill the turbo with oil.

Edited by rwbaldwin, 28 October 2010 - 11:34.


#5 mbames

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 11:49

I was sure there was a thread that gave all details, but I couldn't find it.


Excellent - thanks. I had a search on here, and via google and failed to find it too :-(

I have planned in this event into my calendar - the weekend of the 14th works well for me.

How come the inlet manifold needs to come off? Although that in its self is no bad thing - I can clean it up as I know that has black gunk in it.

Thanks :-)

Edited by mbames, 28 October 2010 - 11:54.


#6 skomaz

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 12:22

Just an aside - Have you thought of cleaning it using the Innotec Turbo Clean Set? - I've heard of good results from other forums and it may save a lot of time/dismantling...

#7 mbames

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 12:25

Just an aside - Have you thought of cleaning it using the Innotec Turbo Clean Set? - I've heard of good results from other forums and it may save a lot of time/dismantling...


I thought about it, but decided I would rather see what state the turbo was in, plus if I get to clean my inlet manifold that is no bad thing as that is a diiiiirty too.

#8 pikpilot

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 18:38

I thought about it, but decided I would rather see what state the turbo was in, plus if I get to clean my inlet manifold that is no bad thing as that is a diiiiirty too.



I found a guide with pictures for the actual turbo dissasembly and cleaning about a year ago. I think it was on a forum for VW tdi engines. I can't look now because I am away from home and using someone elses pc but if you make a google search you should find it.

Mike

#9 mbames

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 18:48

I found a guide with pictures for the actual turbo dissasembly and cleaning about a year ago. I think it was on a forum for VW tdi engines. I can't look now because I am away from home and using someone elses pc but if you make a google search you should find it.


Thanks, I will have a google and see what I can find - if I locate it, I'll post a link here.

Cheers.

#10 yashicamat

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 22:04

There's this link which shows some info: Linky - VNT15 turbo

I believe TurboTechnics will refurb a VNT15 for about £300, that includes new seals, bearing etc. - might be worth a thought before throwing countless hours at trying to dismantle a turbo?

#11 felicia16v

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 09:41

ok I do quite a few of these prob around 2 a month
Inlet mani needs to come off to get the turbo out from the engine bay unless you want to remove the driveshaft?/
when I do them I screw the exh mani to a wooden post thru its mounting holes as its awkward to put in a vice.
you may find that the turbo housing has rusted to the mani and takes a lot or gentle tapping and heating up to remove, do not be tempted to hit the alloy bits with a hammer :doh:
you will probly find that the actuating ring is sticking in the housing due to the housing corroding as out of the last 20 I have done 12 of them have been sticking from rust NOT soot. and all the fancy liquid solutions available will not fix that you need to clean it all away with a good mini dremel etc.
good luck and if you want I will pm my no if you want talking thru any bits

#12 rwbaldwin

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 10:13

Excellent - thanks. I had a search on here, and via google and failed to find it too :-(

I have planned in this event into my calendar - the weekend of the 14th works well for me.

How come the inlet manifold needs to come off? Although that in its self is no bad thing - I can clean it up as I know that has black gunk in it.

Thanks :-)


When you remove the undertray, you will immediately see the access problem from below. The RH driveshaft is in the way, so to get it out from underneath you would need to remove the driveshaft and that means working with the tyres off the ground as you have to remove the bolts that secure the lower arm balljoint in order to pull the hub carrier outward.

A few other tips...
Make sure you have gloves - this job is dirty. Buy a pack of value toothbrushes (4 for 50p at Tesco) and a value washing up bowl (about £1).
Tie a rope to the turbo before you undo the last few manifold nuts, so you can haul it up and lower it back down - it leaves both hands free.
Plusgas - some of the manifold nuts may be tough to remove without it.
There's a chance you may remove a stud. If you do, soak the nut/stud in Plusgas, lock two nuts together on the other end and remove the stuck nut.

Edited by rwbaldwin, 29 October 2010 - 10:33.





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