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HUD Engineer

Sump problems ahead?

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My 56 reg L&K has just had it's 6 year/60,000 mile service. This is it's fifth Skoda service: one was a 2-year span, otherwise it has been done annually. On the service advisory, I was told they had concerns that the sump thread was weak, but that they had managed to tighten it to the proper torque of 30NM. However, from their experience, they anticipate it will be a problem at the next service, where a new sump may need to be fitted. I am frankly astonished that the sump should have such a problem unless there has been some mishandling in the past. The garage don't believe it is covered by the Skoda warranty (due to expire in a few days). I think that They, not I, used the expression "cross threaded", in which case, there is nobody else to blame other than Skoda. They seemed to think that this was not such an uncommon event with Skodas, but internet searches have not brought this problem to light. Can anyone else recall such a problem, or, indeed advise how to get Skoda to acknowledge that this is not a problem caused by the owner?

Thanks,

Andy

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Assuming the sump plug has been used to drop the oil on each service (instead of the increasingly popular method of sucking it out of the filler hole using a pump) then the sump plug has only been removed and tightened 5 times.

It is recommended that a new sump plug is used each time it is removed. Is this part itemised on the last 5 invoices?

If it is only Skoda main dealers that have removed and tightened the sump plug then this is their fault, not yours and it should be repaired FOC.

Considering the car is under warranty I'd be complaining to Skoda UK (08457 745745, option 4).

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Exactly as silver has said. Skoda history then it's down to them. A new sump under warranty. I'd sort it quick if you only have days left.

Good luck.

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Assuming the sump plug has been used to drop the oil on each service (instead of the increasingly popular method of sucking it out of the filler hole using a pump) then the sump plug has only been removed and tightened 5 times.

It is recommended that a new sump plug is used each time it is removed. Is this part itemised on the last 5 invoices?

If it is only Skoda main dealers that have removed and tightened the sump plug then this is their fault, not yours and it should be repaired FOC.

Considering the car is under warranty I'd be complaining to Skoda UK (08457 745745, option 4).

Nobody has ever recommended fitting a new sump plug as being part of the best service technique before, but if it is needed to avoid costly alloy sump damage and replacement, then this ought to be something more people know about. Could you give me contact details for any VAG/Skoda dealer that you know recommends that?

What I find surprising is that there must be many cars that have had oil changes far more times than mine, yet there doesn't seem to be any mention of this problem on the forum, so I'm rather feeling that I've just been handed back a broken teapot that has just been glued back together.

Thanks

Andy

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I don't see how fitting a new plug would make any difference either way. Unless the sealing part is now included in the plug, I think a new washer is mentioned in my handbook?

AS others have mentioned, its either a bad part/ manufacturing defect or incorrect/inept practice at the dealership. Down to them I think. If they don't want to boogie, throw a strop. Once warrarnty is over will you go back if they can't master the threaded fastener? What's to loose?

The vehicle was still in the warranty period when the fault became apparent. It should not matter if it subsequently expires before being resolved, it failed while under warranty.

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I've emailed Customer Service, with the pitch:

Given that I purchased an Approved Used Skoda, purchased a 3 year extended warranty, and have diligently ensured it has been serviced by Skoda franchises at every step, I feel I have done my utmost to preserve the integrity of the car and the warranty...

While these matters may fall into the margins of the scope of the wording of the warranty, I ask that you consider whether I should have to shoulder these problems when I have left everything in the hands of Skoda, and paid for Skoda warranties and Skoda servicing...

I'll let you know what the Skoda Customer Care response is. Their motto is "Manufacturer of happy drivers", remember.

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I've never heard of replacing the sump plug, the washer is a common recommendation.

Dealer to blame if you ask me.

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The cynic in me wonders if they've ****ed up this time and are covering themselves for the next service.

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If it is the same as the rest of the modern VAG family then it does require a new sump plug each time, the sealing washer is integrated with the plug.

I have a number of new ones sat at home from where I maintained my previous A3 and Golf GTi (MK IV) once they were out of warranty.

You can sometimes helicoil repair them, but I would stick to my guns as it has always been removed and replaced by a franchise.

Paul

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Not a fan of the helicoil myself, especially if it is being fitted by the same idiots that broke it in the first place. It is supposed to be a precision engineering procedure - and they can't even put a big bolt in a treaded hole. Friends who do strip threads mention timeserts as a preference.

When I smashed the sump in my mk1, I think the pan itself was aprox £190, a lot less than repairing the result of it coming out at speed

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I don't remember the skoda having a sump washer, just the plug and that's changed every time.

The washer is fixed on the plug, so you have to change the lot.

Paul

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The washer is fixed on the plug, so you have to change the lot.

Paul

That's what I thought, as I hadn't seen a separate copper washer etc in years.

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There is no thread in the sump once it's damaged.

The sump isn't expensive, the change is. So regardless of how you do it you get most of the costs.

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If i remember when servicing my old seat toledo the sump plug was quite hard to get in quite easy to cross thread if you don't know what you are doing ,lets face it these days a lot of young apprentices are doing the hum drum oil services in the stealers,my bet would be the thread is threaded and they just keep on going with it until it was tight ,30Nm isn't that tight,but if you kept on going and tightened it over that it would just go loose.Its all down to Skoda fight it all the way.

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Had exactly the same issue with my previous Octy 1 - always dealer serviced according to schedule. Was informed that a new sump was needed and tried to fight it to the bitter end - only partial success though (car was well out of warranty). Can't recall exact details but IIRC got a complimentary service when next due. No doubt carried out by the same muppet who stripped the thread in the first place!

Let's face it, there can't be a better lubricated thread on the whole car than a sump plug. How on earth can it wear out after only a few removals/replacements?

End result - never went back to that dealer again and now always use my local independent. Skoda's loss!

Dave

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A sump plug bolt with integrated washer, at least for the TDI, is less than £1.30 from the dealers. It certainly isn't worth not replacing for that cost. I believe it is a magnetised steel plug that goes into the aluminium sump, to catch anything nasty floating around in there.

Mike

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I know this is a old post but might help with your Octavia in future..... mine is a 51 plate 1.8Turbo VRS, I noticed a blue sealant on the sump plug and knew there was something wrong here, and surprise surprise some ***K had mashed the threads up previously so the next guy gets to pay for there Elephant like touch!! Up shot of this is I've decided to pay £40 for a Engineering firm near me in Sheffield to Helicoil it , as a new Sump from Skoda is £90 plus there magic sump sealant at only £21 ?? What!!! lol Crazy money!!

Anyway I have my answer I was looking for,and, that it's not just my car with this fault.

And to say it's got full service history ?

And this my fellow people is why I never ever if I can help it take my car or motorbike to a garage.......... :rock:

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In my case, Skoda told me that they removed the sump plug and replaced it with another, supposedly without a problem, but perhaps with a dollop of sealant that I have not yet looked out for. Oh well, under the 2yr Skoda service deal, they will be doing it again come the autumn. I hope they are being honest, but it is interesting to know there are a few cases of mangled sump threads. Bad luck. It sounds as though, like me, you prefer to do the job properly yourself, rather than have to pay premium rates for botched work on straight forward servicing. It suggests a weak design. Andy

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Hmmm. A new sump plug isn't going to be a permanent solution to a shagged thread in the sump pan.

Right on HUD Engineer, I reckon it's a design problem or compromise. I wonder how the designers choose between a sump made of pressed sheet steel and one made of cast alloy? Cost? Ease of manufacture?

Steel plugs and alloy sumps will of course present problems of hard metal driving into soft threads. The only answer is to take care.

If it happens again and you can get the sump off and take a few days with the car off the road, it could be worth taking it to an engineering shop that can handle alloy welding. They might be able to weld up the old thread and then recut it. Most likely be cheaper than a new sump.

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